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Posts for: June, 2014

By Ballenger Creek Dental Associates
June 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
GumInflammationCouldHaveanEffectonYourHeartHealth

Your body’s organ systems are interlinked — what happens in one system may affect another. An example of this is the interrelationship between periodontal (gum) disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Medicine has discovered a common link between these two different conditions — inflammation. A result of the body’s defense mechanisms, chronic inflammation is damaging to both your mouth and your heart. Inflammation can destroy the gum’s soft tissue and underlying bone and lead to tooth loss. In the cardiovascular system, inflammation can begin and accelerate the buildup of plaque within arterial blood vessels (atherosclerosis). This inhibits the flow of oxygenated blood to both the heart and brain, which sets the stage for a heart attack or stroke.

Gum disease begins with poor oral hygiene. When brushing and flossing aren’t performed on a regular basis, or not performed adequately, it allows a thin layer of bacterial plaque called biofilm to build up on the teeth. The bacteria cause infection in the soft tissues of the gum that triggers the chronic inflammation. Because it’s often unaccompanied by other signs of infection like fever, a patient may not even be aware of it. There’s evidence now that inflammation caused by moderate to severe gum disease can contribute to a similar response in blood vessels.

We can treat the gum disease and reduce or eliminate the inflammation. This first requires the removal of all plaque and calculus (harder deposits) on the teeth, down to the root level. It may require surgery to access these areas and to help regenerate some of the lost tissue and bone that support the teeth. It’s also important to institute proper oral hygiene — effective daily brushing and flossing, semi-annual office cleanings and checkups.

In a similar way, you should address signs of inflammation in your cardiovascular system, including blood pressure management and the control of LDL (bad) cholesterol. Because both gum disease and CVD share many of the same risk factors, you can positively impact both your oral and general health by eating more nutritional foods, engaging in regular exercise and quitting tobacco products.

Treating any symptom of inflammation is important to improving your total health. By bringing gum disease and its accompanying inflammation under control, you may in turn help your heart and blood vessels.

If you would like more information on the relationship between heart and gum diseases, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Link Between Heart & Gum Diseases.”


Tooth-ColoredFillingsAretheRestorationofChoiceforBallroomDanceStarCherylBurke

If you've ever watched Dancing with the Stars on television, you've no doubt noticed the vivacious and talented Cheryl Burke, whose ballroom dance moves are as captivating as her bright smile. In fact, Cheryl considers her smile to be one of her most important assets as a professional dancer.

“As a performer, you're basically smiling the whole time,” Cheryl told Dear Doctor magazine recently in an exclusive interview. “It's just really important to take care of your teeth and have a great smile.”

Cheryl is very conscientious about caring for her smile, but that wasn't always the case. In the Dear Doctor interview, Cheryl revealed that her teeth suffered from ineffective oral hygiene when she was younger. “I definitely had my share of cavities,” Cheryl recalled, adding that she believed this was her own fault. “I didn't use floss,” She explained. “I think when you do floss frequently, it helps to reduce the chances of getting cavities. It took me a while to figure it out.”

Once Cheryl did figure it out, she was able to make cavities a thing of the past. But in order to make sure the effects of her prior tooth decay did not mar her lovely smile, she made sure her dentist — who is also her stepdad! — gave her tooth-colored fillings that could not be distinguished from the surface of a natural tooth. “It's important for me,” Cheryl said.

Lots of dental patients feel the same way, even if they don't spend time in front of television cameras. That's why the dental profession has developed tooth-like materials such as composite resins and porcelains that mimic natural tooth material exactly. These materials are also suitable for children's teeth and can incorporate fluoride to reduce tooth decay. It's even possible to replace old silver-colored fillings with these newer dental materials.

If you would like to learn more about tooth-colored fillings, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation. To read Dear Doctor's entire interview with Cheryl Burke, please see “Cheryl Burke.” Dear Doctor also has more on “The Natural Beauty of Tooth-Colored Fillings.”